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Delaware Wetland Monitoring & Assessment Program


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wetland-assessments

Wetlands in an Urban Landscape: The Red Lion Watershed

Written on: September 17th, 2020 in Wetland Assessments

By Erin Dorset, Wetland Monitoring & Assessment Program Most of our wetland assessments throughout the years have been in central and southern Delaware, but in the summer of 2017, our Wetland Monitoring and Assessment crew went north to perform wetland condition assessments at 116 wetlands in the Red Lion watershed. From protocol updates to navigating […]


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Microplastics: A Not So Tiny Tale

Written on: September 17th, 2020 in Outreach

By Mike Mensinger, DNREC Coastal Programs Humans rely heavily on plastics in the modern era. We produce and use plastics for many things in life including, but not limited to, product packaging, plastics bags, utensils and much more. Simply look around your current area and count the number of plastic products or components surrounding you. […]


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It’s an Algae, It’s a Plankton, NO It’s SAV!

Written on: September 17th, 2020 in Outreach

By Michael Bott, DNREC Watershed Assessment and Management Section Delaware’s Inland Bays (Rehoboth Bay, Indian River Bay, and Little Assawoman Bay) are home to many familiar animals such as finfish, crabs, and clams. But did you know that in addition to these aquatic animals, the Inland Bays are also home to many types of aquatic […]


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beneficial-use

Waterway Management in Delaware

Written on: May 15th, 2020 in Beneficial Use

The Shoreline & Waterway Section (SWMS) manages 27 channels in all 3 counties of the State of Delaware. SWMS collaborates with WMAP to find creative and beneficial ways to use sediment dredged


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Delaware’s Climate Action Plan: The First State’s Future

Written on: May 13th, 2020 in Outreach

Delaware is known for its ability to tackle complex problems by bringing its residents together to work out solutions. Among this year’s problems: planning how the state will respond to climate change.


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living-shorelines

The Amazing Oyster

Written on: May 13th, 2020 in Living ShorelinesOutreachWetland Restorations

At first glance, an oyster appears to be little more than, well, a bit of goo inside a rock. But actually, the humble oyster is an environmental warrior with an impressive bag of tricks up its sleeve, and it serves as a keystone species upon which depends the health of a marine ecosystem and the surrounding marsh.


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Rising to Meet the Challenge; Delaware’s Communities Start a Path Forward to Improving Resiliency

Written on: March 13th, 2020 in OutreachWetland Restorations

Guest writer: Kelly Valencik, DNREC Delaware Coastal Programs Communities Seeing Shifts in Mother Nature Many communities throughout our state have already seen changes as a result of climate change- from shifting rainfall and storm patterns, to increased drought, to flooding from sea level rise. These consequences of the warming earth and ocean temperatures as a […]


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living-shorelines

Rising Seas in the Mid-Atlantic

Written on: March 5th, 2020 in Living ShorelinesOutreachWetland Restorations

Although it is happening around the world, there are some spots that are being affected more than others. The Mid-Atlantic Coast—including Delaware—is experiencing one of the highest rates of sea level rise in the U.S, second only to the Gulf Coast.


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Wetlands and their Plant Invaders

Written on: December 11th, 2019 in Outreach

You don’t have to own 20 acres of flooded fields to make a difference! There are many common wetland stressors that are not an easy fix, such as ditching and channel straightening but addressing invasive plants is a great place to start.


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wetland-restorations

Riparian Forest Buffers

Written on: December 10th, 2019 in Wetland Restorations

Riparian buffers are planted areas specifically next to waterways, such as streams, ponds, wetlands, and rivers. These areas are extremely important to keeping our waters healthy.  They do so by filtering and trapping nutrients and sediment out of waters before they enter our local waterways.


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Delaware Wetland Management & Assessment Program
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